Nuestra Luna

A través de la historia del ser humano la Luna ha sido el faro que ha iluminado el cielo de Tierra. Los retos de esta categoría te animan a pensar, de una manera creativa, sobre nuestra vecina más cercana y así ayudar a la NASA a encontrar soluciones a los problemas actuales.

¡Elimina ese Polvo, Inténtalo de Nuevo!

¡Elimina ese Polvo, Inténtalo de Nuevo!

Las misiones Apolo nos mostraron que el polvo lunar no solo era difícil de limpiar e imposible de eliminar de las naves sino que era peligroso para los humanos y potencialmente dañino para los sistemas espaciales. Tu reto será desarrollar un sistema para detectar, mapear y mitigar el polvo lunar para así reducir los daños en los astronautas y los sistemas internos de las naves espaciales.

Pito, Pito, Gorgorito…¡Muestra!

Pito, Pito, Gorgorito…¡Muestra!

Eres el astronauta (o robot) líder de una misión con el objetivo de traer muestras de la Luna a la Tierra para un posterior estudio. ¿Cómo podrías evaluar de una manera rápida y efectiva antes de (o en el transcurso) de tu misión las muestras recogidas? ¿Cómo podrías diferenciar muestras con un valor científico de material sin importancia?


La Cara Artística de la Luna

La Cara Artística de la Luna

Hace cincuenta años el mundo se sorprendió cuando los humanos dieron un gran paso y caminaron sobre la superficie de la luna. Hoy, NASA tiene el encargo de volver a la Luna e ir más allá.

Tu reto será crear un trabajo artístico que comunique, informe e inspire a toda la humanidad sobre el retorno a nuestro satélite.

Elimina ese Polvo, Inténtalo de
Nuevo!

EL DESAFÍO

Las misiones Apolo nos mostraron que el polvo lunar no solo era difícil de limpiar e imposible de eliminar de las naves sino que era peligroso para los humanos y potencialmente dañino para los sistemas espaciales. Tu reto será desarrollar un sistema para detectar, mapear y mitigar el polvo lunar para así reducir los daños en los astronautas y los sistemas internos de las naves espaciales.

Background

Blasted by meteor impacts to sizes even smaller than one micron,
lunar dust invades and sticks in tiny spaces. Its particles are easily blasted across the lunar surface and to high altitudes by rocket engines. The dust has dielectric properties that cause it to be lifted electro-statically off the surface of the moon to inconvenient locations at inconvenient times.

The threat of lunar dust to human health and spacecraft systems is driving future design and operations of those systems to minimize its effects and mitigate it when present. But how can the dust be mitigated unless we know where the dust is located? It may be too small to see, blending in with the background or hiding in crevices. It would be helpful to identify this dust as early as possible, both inside and outside of lunar spacecraft.
Your challenge is to create a lunar dust inspection/detection
system to help in reducing dust presence and/or addressing the
hazard it could cause anywhere from the lunar surface to the free-floating conditions inside the spacecraft after it leaves the lunar surface.

 

Potential Considerations

● Consider the following scenario. Each phase of operation should collectively lead to the least amount of dust in phase 5:
1. When the dust first threatens the system (e.g. astronaut falls
during spacewalk).
2. Prior to opening and entering through the spacecraft hatch (e.g. astronaut brushes off their suit).
Note: Hatch seals are especially vulnerable to dust, so dust
should be kept away from these seals.
3. Inside airlock/ascent vehicle—nominal temperature and pressure (e.g., suit is off, astronaut exposed).
4. After entering the ascent vehicle (if airlock first), but prior to lift-off from the lunar surface.
5. While inside the ascent vehicle/lunar orbiter, in a weightless
environment.
● Inspection/detection system(s) should minimize size, weight, and power across as many phases as practical. Therefore, it is
helpful if the same system can address multiple phases.
● Inspection/detection systems and methods may be different in
each phase.
● Lighting conditions could be from extremely dark to extremely
bright, and both present with sharp shadows.
● Lunar dust locations vary from being trapped in crevices/cloth, to sitting on a surface or suspended in free-space.
● Even dust too small to be seen with the naked eye can be a very
dangerous hazard.
● It is useful for dust mitigation systems/operators to know where
dust has been, and where the dust still remains. Mitigation
methods such as brushing, vacuuming, blowing, or electro-static
adhesion/repulsion should inform the user where and when they
should be applied, and how effective these methods have been.
NASA in no way endorses any non-U.S. Government entity and is not responsible for information contained on non-U.S. Government websites.

Pito, Pito, Gorgorito…¡Muestra!

EL DESAFÍO

Eres el astronauta (o robot) líder de una misión con el objetivo de traer muestras de la Luna a la Tierra para un posterior estudio. ¿Cómo podrías evaluar de una manera rápida y efectiva antes de (o en el transcurso) de tu misión las muestras recogidas? ¿Cómo podrías diferenciar muestras con un valor científico de material sin importancia?

 

Background

Between 1969 and 1972, Apollo astronauts brought back 800 pounds of lunar rocks from six landing sites. How did they know what was the best rock to bring home? When two people walk along the beach, do they both pick up the same type of sea shells or fragments from the same shell?

All lunar samples may have some type of value, but some have more scientific importance than others, and the notion of “value” really depends on the interests of the scientist or engineer. With very limited time and tools to pick up and assess the rocks they gather, how can scientists get the most scientific and engineering “value” from astronauts’ time on the Moon’s surface? Some scientists and/or engineers care about the historical record of the Moon that tells a long story of the origins of our solar system. Some care about the potential for water. Some want to study how meteorites on Earth compare to lunar rock. Some want to build structures on the Moon and therefore need to know the properties of the soil. Many more competing priorities are relevant to today’s scientists and engineers, but in past missions there has been no way to assess the samples during the mission before leaving the Moon to give clear priorities as to which samples or parts of samples to bring home.

The goal of this challenge is to help increase the scientific and engineering value of each human lunar mission by assessing lunar samples before or during the mission and only collecting those samples or parts of samples that are of highest value to the specific mission.

Potential Considerations

For your solution, devise a simulation of a human/robotic mission to the Moon that brings back only the most valuable specimens, and not "extra" material. Be sure to articulate how you are defining “value” in your mission – what purpose do the samples serve, and what characteristics make them “valuable” to you? Remember that value is not necessarily a monetary value, but the collection and return of any sample to Earth does have a cost to it, so your task is to be sure that you are working with the most important samples you can collect.

Some examples of solutions include (but are NOT LIMITED to):
● Describing a novel way to robotically explore and obtain samples
ahead of time
● Designing tools for the crew to inspect in-situ, and select/cut/core
the samples or rocks that are most valuable.
● Proposing a robotic mission to be flown that adapts Mars 2020
robotic capabilities to lunar surface missions so as to make the
best use of astronaut time on the moon
● Exploring tools to obtain samples (e.g., a hand-held core drill,
sample cutting tools, etc.) and nondestructive evaluation (NDE)
inspection technologies such as 3D X-ray, X-ray Fluorescence
(XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Neutron
Spectrometry, and others to be used on either human or robotic
missions to get the most value per pound returned to Earth.
● Developing a ‘scouting’ robot may be tasked to find what areas
to send the astronauts to for gathering samples.
● Designing a system to extract primary science data from the
samples without the need to bring them to Earth for further study.
● Crafting whatever your brilliant minds can imagine!
Your solutions will be evaluated for the following metrics:
● Hours of astronaut time saved.
● Hours of extravehicular activity (EVA) astronaut time saved.
● Percent increase in value per pound of rock/soil leaving the
Moon for Earth.
● Mass of rock/soil not returned because its value was determined in-situ.
● Use of mature systems – minimizing development and efforts to
make them “space ready.”
Here are some tips to consider as you develop your solutions:
● Raw samples may be rocks, rock fragments, core samples, or
dust.
● Interesting zones for obtaining samples may be considerable
distances from a landing site.
● Some craters can be very dark and cold, and may have steep
sides.
● Processed samples may need to preserve stratification; or, they
may only need to include general mineral content.
● Samples that can be evaluated as they are gathered may add
efficiency.

NASA in no way endorses any non-U.S. Government entity and is not responsible for information contained on non-U.S. Government websites.

La Cara Artística de la Luna

EL DESAFÍO

Hace cincuenta años el mundo se sorprendió cuando los humanos dieron un gran paso y caminaron sobre la superficie de la luna. Hoy, NASA tiene el encargo de volver a la Luna e ir más allá. Tu reto será crear un trabajo artístico que comunique, informe e inspire a toda la humanidad sobre el retorno a nuestro satélite.

Background

Fifty years ago, generations were inspired when humans made a giant leap and walked on the moon. Today, NASA is committed to returning to the moon and beyond!
Revisiting the moon will involve many challenges. We will learn how to use the moon’s resources in order to sustain missions at a greater distance and duration. It will not be easy. Radiation, isolation, and dangerous and unexpected environments will test our limits like never before. We will face these challenges and expand the perimeter of the human presence in the interest of exploration.
Your challenge is to create an artistic work to communicate,
inform, or inspire others about humans’ return to the moon. Your
art may be in any form, including (but not limited to): drawing, painting, sculpture, computer generated 2D or 3D, music, film, music video, dance, textile, etc. Think about how you can integrate multiple NASA images or video into your artwork. You can even consider integrating NASA data that isn’t imagery for extra impact!
You must incorporate at least one original NASA image, video, or
audio clip into your solution. The solution may either contain the
original source (in full or in part), or be derived from/inspired by the original NASA source material.

Potential Considerations

● Does the work provoke an emotional response?
● Does the work show a mastery of craftsmanship?
● Does the work exemplify creative excellence that pushes the
boundaries of making or storytelling?
● Does the work show a high level of technical, conceptual, and
aesthetic innovation and display an exceptional level of creative
vision?
● Does the work show an exemplary use of the original NASA
material used?
● Does the work show an exceptional level of creative vision and
execution?
● Does the work capture a creative expression?
● Does the work explore new ideas or techniques?
● Does the work offer a fresh perspective?
The solution must be an original work by you (apart from the NASA
material), meaning that you were the work’s principal creator, and you must have the right to submit it to the NASA International Space Apps Challenge. Your work must have been created after October 1, 2019.
You may upload images, audio, or videos using online repositories, including any provided image/video/audio upload tools on your Space Apps project page. If your final artwork is not audio or video, please include scans, images, or videos which display your work. Your submission must either be in the English language or have English subtitles or captions (to the extent it contains dialogue or text). Final audio or video works must be less than five minutes in total length.
Include links to original NASA source files and materials.
Format types accepted for solutions:
Images: JPEG format / 300 Dots per Inch (DPI) resolution
Video: MP4 format / H.264 codec / 1080p resolution
Audio: MP3 format

Note:
Your solution must not contain any third-party work, even if you have permission or a license. The point of this challenge is to create original art by a person or team at Space Apps. In addition, the solution must not infringe on any third party’s intellectual property rights or privacy rights.
Refer to the Media Usage Guidelines link for information regarding use of NASA content.
NASA in no way endorses any non-U.S. Government entity and is not responsible for information contained on non-U.S. Government websites.

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